Oh,Bromance

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unspeakablevice:

Sometimes I think about Saint-Just and Camille Desmoulins and how their relationship changed overtime. I like to think of there being two phases, the good old days (Part I), and then when things go down hill (Part II).
Part I— Friends, I’ll Be There For You:
They used to correspond as friends! (or at the very least amicable acquaintances)
Saint-Just wrote to Camille about how his speech (the 1790 one in favor for Soissons as the capital for the Department of Aisne) went. He talks about how while his speech failed he received lots of praise (his way of putting that is kinda funny) and that he feels ”confident that in the next legislature I may be with you [Camille] in the National Assembly”. 
At Saint-Just’s request, Camilel featured a “brief comment” on Saint-Just’s epic poem Organt in his journal Les Révolutions de France et de Brabant  (toward the end of 1789).
Also I can’t find where I read it at the moment (so take with a grain of salt), but I’ve read that for a time they were roommates during this ~earlier days of the Revolution~ period.
Even when Saint-Just goes back to Blérancourt because he couldn’t get into the National Assembly due to his age (this was during 1791), he is still writing Camille. “Mon cher Desmoulins” and all that and (paraphrasing here) saying stuff to the effect of you promised you’d write me and you haven’t but I’m sure you’re busy.
I mean of course Saint-Just wanted to be somebody in the scheme of the Revolution, so networking with people was key and no doubt a part of this correspondence. I mean reputation, connections, all of that was very important. Still though, the doesn’t preclude the possibility that they were friends and/or close during this time. 
Buuuut then things change.
Part II— Ch-ch-changes:
In 1792 Saint-Just writes to Daubigny and claims that Camille “lacks the courage of a magnanimous virtue’ and says that he scorns Camille because he has “penetrated his soul”.  
And then during 1793 you Camille’s infamous ‘he carries his head like a sacred host’ remark concerning Saint-Just’s ~arrogance and bearing~.
Then during 1794 you get Saint-Just putting Camille at the head of the list on the decree (the one the Convention voted for) that committed Danton  & co to the Revolutionary Tribunal. 
In conclusion? I need to make a fanmix about this. It’s fascinating! It’s great having this glimpse into Saint-Just’s personal relationships. This isn’t everything there is to say about their dynamic, in fact, I can think of several super interesting things I’ve left out, but that can be for another time. We certainly have more detail on this than on some of Saint-Just’s other relationships. It’s all very intriguing. 

unspeakablevice:

Sometimes I think about Saint-Just and Camille Desmoulins and how their relationship changed overtime. I like to think of there being two phases, the good old days (Part I), and then when things go down hill (Part II).

Part I— Friends, I’ll Be There For You:

  • They used to correspond as friends! (or at the very least amicable acquaintances)
  • Saint-Just wrote to Camille about how his speech (the 1790 one in favor for Soissons as the capital for the Department of Aisne) went. He talks about how while his speech failed he received lots of praise (his way of putting that is kinda funny) and that he feels ”confident that in the next legislature I may be with you [Camille] in the National Assembly”. 
  • At Saint-Just’s request, Camilel featured a “brief comment” on Saint-Just’s epic poem Organt in his journal Les Révolutions de France et de Brabant  (toward the end of 1789).
  • Also I can’t find where I read it at the moment (so take with a grain of salt), but I’ve read that for a time they were roommates during this ~earlier days of the Revolution~ period.
  • Even when Saint-Just goes back to Blérancourt because he couldn’t get into the National Assembly due to his age (this was during 1791), he is still writing Camille. “Mon cher Desmoulins” and all that and (paraphrasing here) saying stuff to the effect of you promised you’d write me and you haven’t but I’m sure you’re busy.
  • I mean of course Saint-Just wanted to be somebody in the scheme of the Revolution, so networking with people was key and no doubt a part of this correspondence. I mean reputation, connections, all of that was very important. Still though, the doesn’t preclude the possibility that they were friends and/or close during this time. 

Buuuut then things change.

Part II— Ch-ch-changes:

  • In 1792 Saint-Just writes to Daubigny and claims that Camille “lacks the courage of a magnanimous virtue’ and says that he scorns Camille because he has “penetrated his soul”.  
  • And then during 1793 you Camille’s infamous ‘he carries his head like a sacred host’ remark concerning Saint-Just’s ~arrogance and bearing~.
  • Then during 1794 you get Saint-Just putting Camille at the head of the list on the decree (the one the Convention voted for) that committed Danton  & co to the Revolutionary Tribunal. 

In conclusion? I need to make a fanmix about this. It’s fascinating! It’s great having this glimpse into Saint-Just’s personal relationships. This isn’t everything there is to say about their dynamic, in fact, I can think of several super interesting things I’ve left out, but that can be for another time. We certainly have more detail on this than on some of Saint-Just’s other relationships. It’s all very intriguing. 

(via crookedsin)